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Research Introduction

Research Subject

Design of biocompatible soft-biomaterials for medical devices

 

Background

Polymeric soft-biomaterials have significant impact in the aged society. Biocompatible and biodegradable polymers have emerged during the past decades to promise extraordinary breakthroughs in a wide range of diagnostic and therapeutic medical devices. Understanding and controlling the interfacial interactions of the polymeric soft-biomaterials with biological elements, such as water, ions, proteins, bacteria, fungai, and cells are of essential towards their successful implementation in biomedical applications.

 

Outcome

In order to understand the underlying mechanisms for the biocompatibility of polymers at the molecular level, we have proposed the “Intermediate Water” concept. The intermediate water behaves differently from bulk water and acts as a physical barrier against protein adsorption and platelet adhesion. The objective of the research is to design of the multi-functional biomedical polymers by controlling bio-interfacial water structure through precision polymer synthesis.

 

Research Figure

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Fig.1.Biointerfaces and biointerfacial water layers: Polymeric soft-materials for the medical devices that may come in contact with human blood should have capacity to resist protein adsorption and blood cell adhesion and thus triggering the organism’s defense systems
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Fig.2.Differential scanning calorimetry heating curve of biocompatible polymer (ex. R1:H, R2:C2H5, m:2). The intermediate water was only found in hydrated biopolymers (proteins, polysaccharides and nucleic acid; DNA and RNA) and biocompatible synthetic polymers.
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Fig.3. Cancer cells can attach on Poly(2-methoxyethyl acrylate) (PMEA )and poly(tetrahydrofurfuryl acrylate) (PTHFA) substrates with deformed fibronectin. Platelets cannot attach because fibrinogen deformation is suppressed by intermediate water.

 

Design of biocompatible polymers based on the intermediate water concept

Institute for Materials Chemistry and Engineering, Kyushu University & Frontier Center for Organic Materials, Yamagata University

In biomedical applications, there are continuous efforts to enhance methods, materials, and devices. The recent development of novel biomaterials and their applications to biomedical problems have dramatically improved the treatment of many diseases and injuries. Although a various types of materials in biomedicine have been used widely, most biomaterials lack the desired functional properties to interface with biological systems and have not been engineered for optimum performance. Therefore, there is an increasing demand to develop novel materials to address such problems in biomedicine arena1,2.There are numerous parameters of polymeric biomaterials that can be affected the cellular behavior in a controlled manner. The underlying mechanisms for the biocompatibility of polymers at the molecular level are complex and have not been clearly demonstrated, although many theoretical and experimental efforts have been made to understand these mechanisms. Water and proteins interactions have been recognized as fundamental for the biological response to contact with polymers. We have proposed the "Intermediate Water" concept3-28; the water exhibited clearly defined peaks for cold crystallization in the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) chart, a strong peak at 3400 cm-1 in a time-resolved Infrared (IR) spectrum and higher mobility of water in a 2H-NMR. The intermediate water was only found in hydrated biopolymers (proteins, polysaccharides and nucleic acid; DNA and RNA) as well as hydrated biocompatible synthetic polymers. The intermediate water behaves differently from bulk water and acts as a physical barrier against protein adsorption and platelet adhesion. We hypothesized that intermediate water, which prevents the proteins and blood cells from directly contacting the polymer surface, plays an important role in the biocompatibility of polymers. Here, we highlight recent developments of biocompatible polymeric biomaterials for medical devices as well as tissue engineering and overview of the recent progress of the design of the multi-functional biomedical polymers by controlling bio-interfacial water structure through precision polymer synthesis29.

 

Keywords:Cell adhesion; Protein adsorption; Water structure; Polymer synthesis; Medical devices.

Cell and materials interfaces; biointerfaces and biointerfacial water layers.

Cell and materials interfaces; biointerfaces and biointerfacial water layers.

 

Acknowledgements

M.T. acknowledges financial support from the Funding Program for Next-Generation World-Leading Researchers (NEXT Program) of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) of Japan.

 

References

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M. Tanaka, et al., Design of biocompatible and biodegradable polymers based on intermediate water concept,
Polym. J., 47, 114-121 (2015).
ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces, 7, 18096-18103 (2015).
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Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun., 457, 353-357 (2015).
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 17, 17399-17405 (2015).
Stem Cells Int. in press.
Journal of Bioactive and Compatible Polymers, in press.
Adv. Healthcare Mater, 3, 775 (2014). Nanomedicine, 10, 313 (2014).
Langmuir, 30, 10698 (2014). Tissue Eng. A (2013), JP Patent 2014-105221 etc.

 

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NEXT Program Kyushu University Frontier Center for Organic System Innovations  Innovative Flex Course for Frontier Organic Material Systems (iFront) Science and Technology Policy Cabinet Office

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